Food Allergies

Cleaning Pacifiers With Antiseptics May Cause Food Allergies

Children's pacifiers cleaned with antiseptic agents - rather than boiled or cleaned by other methods - have been shown to increase the risk of children developing a food allergy by age one year in a study of 894 infants in Austrailia. Researchers conclude that using other methods of cleaning pacifiers could help prevent the onset of childhood food allergies.

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Why Celiac Disease Develops

Two separate research studies published in the journal Immunity provide significant details about why immune cells attack the body's own healthy tissues in response to a harmless substance that the immune system mistakenly perceives as a threat. The results are likely to further research efforts designed to combat and hopefully prevent autoimmune disorders like celiac disease.

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Sesame Allergy on the Increase

Sesame allergy is on the rise and quickly becoming one of the top food allergens, according to a report published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. he sesame seed and its by products are used widely in the food industry. You may be familiar with sesame seed hamburger buns, sesame seed crackers or sesame seed breadsticks. But are you aware sesame oil is used in pharmaceutical products? It is often used in ointments, soaps, and cosmetics.

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A Safer Way to Diagnose Food Allergy

Research regarding a safer and less expensive way to diagnose food allergy in children was presented in the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology. Childhood allergies to foods are very common. The most common food allergies in young children are milk, eggs, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, and soy. Although statistics show 8 percent of young children are allergic to these common foods, a clinical history of a food allergy is only accurate half of the time.

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The Prevalence of Celiac Disease

Although serious conditions ranging from diabetes, anemia, short stature, infertility, Down Syndrome and diarrhea can all be associated with celiac disease, few people in the U.S. have heard of it. A multi-center study led by the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research in Baltimore finds that celiac disease is much more common in this country than previously thought.

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Food Allergy Prevention

Nursing mothers can help prevent or delay food allergic reactions in high-risk infants through dietary modifications, according to a report in the New England Journal of Medicine. High-risk infants are those who have someone in their family who has allergies.

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Food Allergies: The Enemy Within

The guidance document is the result of several years of negotiation by a high-level collaboration of experts from regulatory agencies representing Canada, USA, Australia, Japan, the European Union, academic research institutions, and food allergen test-kit manufacturers, under the auspices of the AOAC (Association of Analytical Communities) Presidential Taskforce on Food Allergens.

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Food-Allergy Fears Drive Overly Restrictive Diets

Many children, especially those with eczema, are unnecessarily avoiding foods based on incomplete information about potential food-allergies, according to researchers at National Jewish Health. The food avoidance poses a nutritional risk for these children, and is often based primarily on data from blood tests known as serum immunoassays.

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