Children and Allergies

E.R. Visits by Children for Anaphylaxis Increasing

From 2008 to 2016, the overall incidence of emergency department visits for anaphylaxis saw a 2.3-fold increase, with the greatest increase occurring in children under five years of age, according to a recently published article in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice (JACI: In Practice), an official journal of the AAAAI.

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Children of Allergy Sufferers at Risk

Infants of parents with allergies have a much higher risk of developing allergies themselves early in life and should be tested early to detect possible respiratory problems. Infants whose parents have allergies, that produce symptoms like wheezing, asthma, hay fever or hives, risk developing allergic sensitization much earlier in life than previously reported, according to a study by Cincinnati researchers.

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Early Cat Exposure May Increase Children's Risk of Eczema

Children who are exposed to cats soon after birth may have an increased risk of developing eczema, according to a study presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference. Being exposed to two or more dogs at home suggested a slightly protective, but not significant, effect on children's risk of developing eczema, said lead researcher Esmeralda Morales, M.D., Pediatric Pulmonary Fellow at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

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Children Playing Sports Unprepared for Asthma Attacks

More than three-fourths of children with asthma were unprepared for an exercise-induced bronchospasm event, or asthma attack, according to scientists. Since exercise can be a trigger for asthma attacks and inhalers are the best treatment, the researchers stressed that it's critical inhalers be available during physical activity.

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Common Childhood Allergies

The causes of allergies are not fully understood. Your child can get allergies from coming into contact with allergens. Allergens can be inhaled, eaten, injected (from stings or medicine), or they can come into contact with the skin.

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Airborne Mold Spores Increase Kids' Risk for Multiple Allergies

University of Cincinnati (UC) researchers say exposure to a certain group of fungal spores -- abundant in the air that we breathe every day -- can make young children more susceptible to developing multiple allergies later in life. The team found that infants who were exposed to basidiospores and other airborne fungal spores -- specifically penicillium/aspergillus and alternaria -- early in life were more likely to develop allergies to mold, pollen, dust mites, pet dander and certain foods as they grew older.

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Psycho-Social Factors Influence How Teens Manage Allergies

A survey of teens/pre-teens with food allergies and their parents indicates that social ramifications have much to do with how young people manage their illness as they approach young adulthood. The report, Parent and Adolescent Perceptions on Food Allergy, was presented by the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN) at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology.

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Blood Test for Newborns to Detect Allergy Risk

A simple blood test can now predict whether newborn babies are at high risk of developing allergies as they grow older, thanks to research involving the University of Adelaide. Professor Tony Ferrante, an immunologist from SA Pathology and the Children 's Research Centre at the University of Adelaide, says the new marker may be the most significant breakthrough in allergy testing for some decades.

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