Asthma

Mother's Depression Linked to Childhood Respiratory Illnesses

Stress and depression in expectant and new mothers are risk factors for more childhood respiratory illnesses in early life, and maternal depression is associated with a non-allergic asthma type of childhood asthma. These findings suggest that reducing stress and depression in expectant and new mothers in low-income urban populations could reduce childhood colds and non-atopic asthma.

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Prenatal Vitamin D Sufficiency Reduces Childhood Asthma Risk

Childhood asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood in the United States and globally. Maternal asthma is a major risk factor in the development of childhood asthma and wheezing. The vitamin D (VD) status in pregnancy has emerged as a modifiable factor influencing these outcomes. The combined effects of maternal asthma status and prenatal VD status across pregnancy have not been assessed to date.

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Asthma During Pregnancy Remains Poorly Controlled

Uncontrolled asthma during pregnancy may come with an elevated risk for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, and is estimated to complicate between 3 percent and 10 percent of pregnancies. A new study shows that poorly controlled asthma during pregnancy continues to be common in the United States.

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The Barriers of Severe Asthma Management

Though the majority of asthmatic patients experience mild to moderate symptoms, those with severe asthma face increased challenges when it comes to asthma management. A new but small study from The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice highlights the support gaps that still need to be filled for patients living with severe asthma.

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'Stepping Up' Asthma Treatment Helps Children

Children with asthma who continue to have symptoms while using low-dose inhaled corticosteroids could benefit from increasing the dosage or adding one of two asthma drugs, a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine and other institutions finds. Results of the study, called BADGER (Best ADd-on therapy Giving Effective Responses) may also allow physicians to better predict which of the three options will help a patient the most.

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Aggressive Treatment of Childhood Eczema Could Help Prevent Asthma

A study, published online in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, calls for trials of aggressive therapies against childhood eczema in attempt to reduce the incidence of asthma in later life. The study, conducted by the University of Melbourne, Monash University and Menzies Research Institute in Tasmania, has followed more than 8500 people who are part of the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study from the ages of seven to 44.

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Smoking Makes Asthma Worse

Tobacco smoke is an exceptionally aggravating trigger that can worsen asthma symptoms for the nearly 20.3 million people in the United States who suffer from asthma. Quitting smoking should be a priority for people who have asthma, or have family members with asthma, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI).

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