The Barriers of Severe Asthma Management

Though the majority of asthmatic patients experience mild to moderate symptoms, those with severe asthma face increased challenges when it comes to asthma management. A new but small study from The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice highlights the support gaps that still need to be filled for patients living with severe asthma.

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Obese Girls More Prone to Allergic Disease

The effect of gender and obesity in atopic, or allergic, disease in children in an urban environment is relatively understudied. New research being presented at the 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) Annual Meeting gives insight into which populations are most at risk of atopic disease and what can be done to prevent it.

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Epipens Lose Potency When Stored in Hot Car

Patients may want to think twice before leaving their EpiPen inside their vehicle, according to a small pilot study published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice (JACI: In Practice). The study found even a single, short-time exposure to heat in a car during a sunny day can decrease epinephrine concentration in autoinjectors. If such degradation turns out to be progressive or cumulative, it could result in significant underdosage of epinephrine during anaphylaxis.

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'Stepping Up' Asthma Treatment Helps Children

Children with asthma who continue to have symptoms while using low-dose inhaled corticosteroids could benefit from increasing the dosage or adding one of two asthma drugs, a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine and other institutions finds. Results of the study, called BADGER (Best ADd-on therapy Giving Effective Responses) may also allow physicians to better predict which of the three options will help a patient the most.

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Aggressive Treatment of Childhood Eczema Could Help Prevent Asthma

A study, published online in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, calls for trials of aggressive therapies against childhood eczema in attempt to reduce the incidence of asthma in later life. The study, conducted by the University of Melbourne, Monash University and Menzies Research Institute in Tasmania, has followed more than 8500 people who are part of the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study from the ages of seven to 44.

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Children of Allergy Sufferers at Risk

Infants of parents with allergies have a much higher risk of developing allergies themselves early in life and should be tested early to detect possible respiratory problems. Infants whose parents have allergies, that produce symptoms like wheezing, asthma, hay fever or hives, risk developing allergic sensitization much earlier in life than previously reported, according to a study by Cincinnati researchers.

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Early Cat Exposure May Increase Children's Risk of Eczema

Children who are exposed to cats soon after birth may have an increased risk of developing eczema, according to a study presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference. Being exposed to two or more dogs at home suggested a slightly protective, but not significant, effect on children's risk of developing eczema, said lead researcher Esmeralda Morales, M.D., Pediatric Pulmonary Fellow at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

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Why Celiac Disease Develops

Two separate research studies published in the journal Immunity provide significant details about why immune cells attack the body's own healthy tissues in response to a harmless substance that the immune system mistakenly perceives as a threat. The results are likely to further research efforts designed to combat and hopefully prevent autoimmune disorders like celiac disease.

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